Wednesday, April 5, 2017

Which do you prefer ?

Both these walls use the same stones. The top example — the stones had very little shaping done to them. The bottom one — all the stones were shaped and squared.  Which one of these dry stone walling styles do you prefer and why. Leave a comment or write to me. The pros and cons will be discussed tomorrow incorporating everyone's feedback. 

Don't worry there won't be a test at the end of the week.  

6 comments:

  1. Hi, The top one! Something about the letting the stones be stones. Trying to make them like "bricks" doesn't feel right.

    Thanks for the blog posts. I found you randomly, and enjoy what you do.

    I'm part of the way through building a masonry heater in our farmhouse. Not sure if you know him, but I've been working with Eric Moshier, of Solid Rock Masonry in Duluth, MN (USA).

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  2. Irregular shaped stone makes for a stronger wall, if done correctly and carefully, and it is more interesting to look at. Incan palaces for example in earthquake prone Peru. Horizontally or vertically laid stone of same shape and size are easier to work with and although they maximise their strengths, when laid along the same plane, they also have the same weaknesses.

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  3. The top wall. That method is true to my experience with the rock in my area. Dolerite doesen't take kindly to chisels.

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  4. No question: The top one! It looks more natural, it's more interesting, and it causes the eye to wander and "explore". Come on down to Atlanta anytime. I'd love to have a wall like that!

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  5. I like them both although the top one is a bit busy and to me seems more suited to mortared work. The lower one has nice coursed lines and looks stronger. I just went through this dilemma myself, although my own solution is a bit between the two styles, use the stone at hand to best suit your style and build to last without shaping everything.

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  6. The top one, absolutely! It's probably the one that makes the least economic sense - tetris perfection to such a degree takes time (and time=money), but when I look at a wall I want to think about beauty and not about a few cents/pennies saved.

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