Saturday, August 31, 2013

Extended Holiday


The idea of piling stones over each other so they stretch further and further out over a deep cavernous opening, without the use of fasteners or cement or any support from below seems a bit crazy. Each row of stones inches its way over the opening extending upward into the middle of the chamber. It seems like a precarious gamble against the laws of physics and common sense. It's more like a magic trick, one that one shouldn't try at home (or abroad). The concept of the 'cantilever' is a bit of a 'can't believe her' sometimes. But anyway we venture on... out over the abyss, boldly going where no stones have gone before. By the end of next week a dome eight and a half feet in diameter consisting of 5 tons of dry laid stone will hang gracefully, twelve feet in the air over the below-ground circular chamber that we completed just last week.







7 comments:

  1. Just make sure that you leave the door open or else you two might entomb yourselves!

    Looks like a really interesting project.

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  2. Lot's of interesting face stone shapes fitted together their. Looks too, like a few different stone types. Is most of the stone being picked from the excavation piles I see around the chamber- or pulled from nearby hedge rows?

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  3. Yes - It is very interesting to try to figure out the most structural way to build this thin.

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  4. We are using local limestone bedrock Dan, except for the dome which is slightly less local sandstone.

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  5. The "slightly less local sandstone" has come from a Lancashire quarry where the client's great-grandfather and grandfather worked and so has "significance" for the project. The greater part of the limestone used came from the excavation hole, or from stone remaining from the base of a robbed out old wall, originally quarried from a "delph" (small quarry) at the other end of the wood.

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