Friday, June 17, 2011

Knitting the two skills together



  • Start Row 1 with a right-side row. Knit 3, slip one stitch to a cable needle and hold in front of your work. Knit the next stitch on the needle, then knit the stitch held on your cable needle. This stitch pattern will be abbreviated as CF1. Knit 4 stitches, then repeat the cable pattern. The full pattern for Row 1 is K3, *CF1, K4* to last 3 stitches, K3. The CF1, K4 pattern repeats to the last three stitches.

  • Purl across Row 2 if you are knitting flat. This and all wrong-side rows or even-numbered rows will be purled if knit flat and knitted if you are knitting in the round. If you have added a border, continue it as desired.

  • Cable Row 3 in the following pattern: K2, *CF1, CB1* to last two stitches. CB1 means to cable back one stitch by allowing your cable needle with the slipped stitch on it to hang behind the work. This row provides the first cross of your lattice cable pattern. Purl Row 4, being sure to keep your tension even.

  • Knit Row 5 as follows: K1, *CB1, K2, CF1*, K1. Row 6 is purled when knitting flat. You should now be able to see the beginning of a lattice pattern in your knitting and see and correct any errors.

  • Continue the pattern in Row 7. CF1, K4 across the row until 2 stitches remain, then CF1 again. Purl Row 8 unless knitting in the round. Row 9 is the reverse of Row 5, and reads K1, *CB1, K2, CF1* K1. Purl across Row 10. The final pattern row, Row 11, is K2, *CB1, CF1,* K2. Row 12 is a purl row, then the pattern will begin again. Repeat to desired length for your knit lattice cable.

  • Row 1: K3, *CF1, K4* K3. Row 2 and all even numbered rows: purl. Row 3: K2, *CF1, CB1,*K2. Row 5: K1, *CF1, K2, CB1, *K1. Row 7: *CF1, K4 to last 2 stitches, CF1. Row 9: K1,*CB1, K2, CF1*K1. Row 11: K2, *CB1, CF1,*K2. This lattice cable pattern creates an easy and interesting visual effect in your knitting. There is little distortion, and while blocking will help the cables bloom, it is not critical.


  • Knitting with Aran Wall


  • Start row with a right-side leaning of your stones. Knit three together slip one pitched sideways and hold each one with another along your wall. Fit the next on the other, then knit a big upright, one that you're capable of moving. This wall pattern will be abbreviated as CF1. Fit 4 with the stones then randomly repeating the pattern. The full pattern for the first row of stones is CF1, K4* to last 3 stones K3. The pattern repeats to the cheek end .

  • Wall across course 2 if you are fitting flat. This and all wrong-side rows or even-numbered rows will be placed into each other and fit flat and fitted diagonally if you are working your way around. If you have added a border, continue it as desired. Leave lots of spaces.

  • Make Row 3 stable in the following pattern: K2, *CF1, CB1* to the last two ditches. CB1 means to carry back one stone by allowing your stones to straddle each other without slipping sideways and remember to stand back and behind the work to study how it's looking. This row provides the first cross of your lattice pattern. Finish Row 4, being sure to keep your fencing straight and even. Occasionally add bigger ones vertically as needed.

  • Fill in between

  • You should now be able to see the beginning of a lattice pattern in your walling and see and correct any errors. It should not look chaotic or too bland either.

  • Continue the structural pattern along CF1, K4 across the row until the last copes remain to be done then CF1 again. The final pattern row should be relatively level along the top row of stones. Repeat to desired length for your wall lattice stonework.

  • This satisfying pattern creates an easy and interesting visual effect in your walling. There is little distortion, and the slanted blocking pattern will help this type of wedged wall not unravel for a long time.

    Your walls will keep your wooly sheep nice and cozy and protected even in cold weather.

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