Tuesday, November 8, 2016

Which would you vote for?



Disregarding the wall's thickness for the moment, consider carefully stacking a selection of flattish random stones horizontally, in courses, between two upright boulders, in a way that is well bonded and structural.  



Now, consider using the same stones and this time stacking them vertically, wedging them securely against each other, between the same upright boulders which are spaced the same distance apart. Which wall do you think is stronger?
Which one couldn't you push down very easily?  Which do you think would last longer? Which looks more interesting? Which would you vote for in an open walling competition? 

I know the one I would vote for.

7 comments:

  1. Horizontally placed stones are sleeping. It takes little strength to sleep. Vertical stones stand strong and tall but it takes considerably more muscle to get them there.

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  2. Much prefer vertical. It can only get tighter.

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  3. Very true. So why do you think vertical walling is not promoted or done more in N A or England for that matter ?

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  4. It may depend on the forces applied. Harbour walls when waves hit them from the side,are often laid vertically while walls with traffic like sheep dogs or humans over them are thought to be stronger when laid horizontally.Norman

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  5. Habit? Masons don't lay brick vertical? Everyone thinks flat stones make the best walls? I'm not sure, but I'll be promoting it as much as possible. That and singling. And what about copes? It's always a fight to put on vertical copes. We will continue to educate the public and some day they may come around.

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  6. As the end boulders are already vertical and only a short length is built between, vertical stones between is visually more appealing. In both the white boulder shape catches the eye.

    A horizontal stone rests stable on the ground, a vertical one needs lateral support. I'm coping a wall at the moment in one of our local styles with flat copes set about 40 degrees from vertical, one locks the next in place and you get away with rather fewer copes.

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  7. hmmm, interesting topic. and interesting comments about it. the horizontal walling puts no lateral pressure on the boulders or slabs that frame it, but the wedge walling does, so perhaps they should be dug into the ground more than shown and/or inclined into the wall. I think that the vertically oriented walling in places where it is customarily done, like Inis Oirr, often ends in a block of horizontally laid stonework—or slabs that lean into the body of the wall.

    Like T. J, says, habit, aka tradition, rules. vertical walling, to my knowledge anyway, was never practiced much in N. A. so it never caught on. much like vertical coping.

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