Sunday, October 21, 2012

Bridge visits


While travelling from the Canadian Dry Stone Wall Festival in Montreal two weeks ago (where wallers from all over built a 35 foot double-arched bridge) Gavin, Norman, Christopher and I dropped in on two other dry stone bridges on the way back to Port Hope. I was delighted to see that this one, Monarch Bridge, in Alderville, Ontario, which Danny Woodward and I built, last August, had very recently been landscaped. The grass was starting to grow and water now collects in a pool directly under the arch and gives the whole bridge setting a very tranquil appearance.



5 comments:

  1. It's lovely to see the water running under the bridge JSR, nicely done.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Nice tight work John!! Must of been a shaping frenzy going on to reach such a high standard of construction!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A casual visitor to the bridge might think so , but no, as Patrick McAfee pointed out as we were building it, the method of construction we were using involved the least amount of shaping and hammering that could possibly be used an still create a structural bridge of this sort.

      Delete
    2. I am referring to the structure we built as a demonstration of traditional dry stone building at our festival, not to this one which is a bit more shaped but even so, not excessively.

      Delete
  3. I'm pretty sure that the high standards of perfection can still be attained by finding the correct shapes of stone without having to use a cut saw to shape every stone in a structure. Hell, if you're going to make it look like a block wall than you might as well use blocks and leave the lovely varying shapes of stones for those that can think more creatively... 'outside the blocks' shall we say. Maybe ikea can start making kits for those who can't solve the puzzle. Just beware of the extra pieces thrown in for "bad measure".

    ReplyDelete